Speakers and papers

 

Speakers and their abstracts and papers

Patrice Adam (France) : Vie personnelle – vie professionnelle : quel(s) équilibre(s) en droit français du travail?
Ulrich Becker (Germany) : Need and options for reforms in a national and supranational perspective
Stefano Bellomo (Italy) : Conclusion and termination of employment relationship in professional sports: special regulations and particular protection requirements
Susanne Burri (Netherlands) : Work-life balance measures: recent EU developments and the Dutch approach
Giuseppe Casale (Italy/ITCILO) : Labour Law and promotion of jobs
Kübra Dogan Yenisey (Turkey)
Eberhard Eichenhofer (Germany) : What demands EU law to assist and integrate asylum seekers and refugees?
Ronnie Eklund (Sweden) : Temporary Agency Work Directive – As Hollow As Swiss Cheese?
Stein Evju (Norway) : The State as Regulator and Partner in Industrial Relations
Maximilian Fuchs (Germany) : Labour market integration of refugees – law and practice in Germany
Magdalena Nogueira Guastavino (Spain) : Crisis and labor reforms in Spain: a change of paradigm?
Jozsef Hajdú (Hungary) : New challenges for social security in digital age
Frank Hendrickx (Belgium) : What if sport and labour law have become interlocked?​
Mijke S. Houwerzijl / Bas Rombouts (Netherlands) : Cross-border temporary agency work: social sustainability of a business model based on regulatory arbitrage?
Petr Hůrka (Czech Republic) : The role of the state in labour relations on the example of the Czech republic
Romuald Jagodziński (ETUI/Poland) : EWC Recast Directive: its impact, problems and outlooks
Yves Jorens (Belgium) : Migrant workers and European social law: of a respectable age or time for a rebirth?
Kristina Koldinská (Czech Republic) : Facing the migration crisis with social integration instruments
Polonca Koncar (Slovenia) : Decent work and migrant workers
Attila Kun (Hungary) : Beyond EWCs? – Global mechanisms of information-sharing and workers’ involvement within MNEs
Jean-Pierre Laborde (France) : Social Security, A New Idea For The Twenty-First Century
Kwang-Taek LEE (Korea) : Social Security in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution
Antoine Lyon-Caen (France) : The French reforms: What conciliation between labour market, enterprise and fundamental rights?
Franz Marhold (Austria) : Solidarity revisited – Who for whom?
José Maria Miranda (Spain)
Angelika Muller (Belarus/ILO): National social dialogue institutions: European and global trends
Maria Do Rosario Palma-Ramalho (Portugal) : Temporary agency work and other atypical forms of employment in a changing labour market: the Portuguese experience
Costas Papadimitriou (Greece) : The particularities of the “job” performance of the professional athlete: Rights and obligations of the parties to the employment contract
Jan Pichrt (Czech Republic) : Current challenges in the Czech Labour and Social Security Law in historical context (opening address)
Marek Pliszkiewicz (Poland) : Social Dialogue in Poland on Historical and Comparative Background
Lubomír Ptáček (Czech Republic) : A professional sportsmen – an independent worker?
Vít Samek (Czech Republic) : Crossroads of social dialogue in the Czech Republic
Dagmara Skupień (Poland) : European Works Councils – Problems of Effectiveness
Krassimira Sredkova (Bulgaria) : Labour law guarantees work – education balance
Věra Štangová (Czech Republic) : La conciliation des vies familiales et professionnelles des femmes
Martin Štefko (Czech Republic) : The Guaranteed minimum income for all?
Jaroslav Stránský (Czech Republic) : Equal Treatment between the Temporary Agency Workers and the Comparable Workers of the User Undertaking
Grega Strban (Slovenia) : The State’s recognition of social partners in social security
Tiziano Treu (Italy) : Public policy responses to the transformation of work and of industrial relations
Jesus Cruz Villalon (Spain) : The role of the State in Industrial Relations from a European Perspective
Manfred Weiss (Germany)
Marcin Wujczyk (Poland) : Social Integration of Migrants under European Social Charter – right or duty?